5 Ways to Manage Stress – Alopecian Edition

Before we begin, there is one thing I want to make absolutely clear: This article isn’t about help you lower stress levels in order to start hair regrowth. It’s about lowering stress levels in order to live happier and healthier.

Alopecia Areata is not caused by stress.

Reducing stress is not a cure for Alopecia Areata. Though some people find that their hair loss seems to be related to their long term mental and emotional states, research into this aspect has found little consistent data. Reducing stress does however assist in overall health improvement, and has been found to assist cardiovascular health, digestion, immune function and even skin appearance. The improvement to mood, sleep patterns, over all productivity and happiness also demonstrate the reducing and managing stress can be a vital step in an overall healthy lifestyle.

Continue reading “5 Ways to Manage Stress – Alopecian Edition”

Discussion Series: Would you peel the scalp of a two year old?

 

Twenty years ago my journey with Alopecia Areata started.  My son, then 20 months old, had a chicken pox that rested at the hairline on his forehead.  Within days his hair had fallen out and was starting to receded down the center of his scalp.

With no knowledge of the cause and no visible sign of hair regrowth, off we went to the dermatologist.

On inspecting my son, the conclusion was Alopecia Areata. After the general questions probing what that meant, came the question from me “so how do we treat this”.

I’ll never forget the following words.  Continue reading “Discussion Series: Would you peel the scalp of a two year old?”

Power of the bald – Power of me.

This is a struggle for power around accepting this path we are on, and indeed it is a path, not a curse, not a karmic debt or victimization that separates us from others. I see it all as an untying of the knots, a blessing and a valuable lesson on this journey.

We are all born and move through life tying ourselves in knots. Knots are formed through expectations; conditionings, beliefs and they form knots of fear, insecurity, difference and anxiety. We succumb to false identities and ways of being that leave us measuring ourselves against false images of what we should and shouldn’t be.

Continue reading “Power of the bald – Power of me.”

The Tropical Challenge – Beating the Heat while living with Alopecia

alopecia-and-hot-weather-author-linseyBy Linsey

Living in the tropics and coping with alopecia has been an interesting challenge for me.

I grew up in Indonesia practically on the equator. It was hot, sticky and 100% humidity. When I first got a wig I still had quite a lot of hair on my head— hair that I was not ready to give up on or shave off. I was thirteen and I didn’t want anyone to know I was going bald. I was so ashamed. So I wore my wig on top of my hair, sometimes even to bed. I broke out into heat rash on my head and my face. My skin was not happy and neither was I.

Continue reading “The Tropical Challenge – Beating the Heat while living with Alopecia”

Taking the Plunge: Telling people about your Alopecia

There was a time in my life where I would’ve preferred to run 10 km in spandex through Melbourne CBD than tell any of my friends about having Alopecia. Luckily, as I got older, I realised that people probably wouldn’t act like I’d committed a mortal sin for having the audacity to get a chronic illness. It was a process. That being said, I’ve had some amazing experiences and some not as good experiences when telling friends about this condition. Whether you want to tell your whole school, someone at work, or a new friend or partner about your alopecia, it can feel pretty scary. But with the right preparation and the proper tools, it doesn’t have to be. Learn from my mistakes Young Padawan and stock up your arsenal of awareness weapons.  Continue reading “Taking the Plunge: Telling people about your Alopecia”

What NOT to say to someone with Alopecia

gemmaHi, I’m Gemma. I’m 22 years old and I’m a registered nurse. I first lost my hair last year when I was 21 and working at a nursing home. I’d worked at this nursing home for 2 years already so I was well known by all the residents. However, I soon discovered that sometimes elderly people say whatever they want without really thinking about it, which, let’s face it, if I had lived a whole life censoring myself in society, I’d stop trying when I was old too.

One day I was having a particularly emotionally hard day at work, and I decided to write a response to every comment that had been said to me since I started losing my hair, and created this list of things not to say to someone with alopecia.  Continue reading “What NOT to say to someone with Alopecia”

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